Archive for the 'Experiments' Category

Touch-screen Mobile Timer

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

Countdown Timer screen shot
view the pageview the code

I am resurrecting Countdown Timer from, oh, about, 4 years ago! I have yet to find a simple timer app for iPhone that I like; so why not make one myself?

So, it’s not an iOS app (yet…), but to get it running on the mobile, quick-and-dirty-like, I used processing.js to throw it into and HTML5 <canvas>. I have also begun re-working the controls to be more touch-appropriate. For example, it no longer relies on keyboard input to adjust the time; now you increase and decrease the time in 5-minute increments by simply tapping (or clicking) in the top or bottom half of the page.

There are still a few kinks to work out and some maths to tweak, but I think its a pretty good proof-of-concept for ~20 minutes of work.

About Time

Saturday, February 28th, 2009

About Time. A clock for kairos time.

run the sketch—view the code

How do you use it?
Tell somebody about what time it is.

What is it?
A clock… sort of. This sketch is just a modification of the anaLog Clock from last March. Watch it for a few seconds if you can. It’s drawing the clock hands at random distances from where they should be according to the actual time. The result… you can only tell about what time it is. I know it’s hard to watch, but that’s really not the point. I’d like to polish it up a little, but for now, consider it a proof of concept.

Why is it cool?
My life is a constant struggle with time. Or, more specifically, chronos time. If I can avoid knowing the “exact” time, I’m all for it. Maybe this is clock for kairos time.

It works!…

Sunday, October 12th, 2008

Is there an emoticon for crossed fingers?

If you’ve been here in the last few months you’ll have read about my ISP issues. Add to that some summer vacations, and preparing for the arrival of our first child (who’s currently featured in the header image) and you end up with a situation that left P{three-sixty}5 on the back burner for a while.

Well, I’m happy to announce that I’m getting back on the horse. We’ve ironed-out the server issues, upgraded WordPress and, if a few more tests go well, you’ll be seing regular posts again.

Until then, if you have an Apple laptop with a Sudden Motion Sensor (built-in to sense if you drop the computer) you can play with this sketch that lets you draw by tilting your computer around. It uses the Processing Unimotion SMS library by the always inspiring Daniel Schiffman.

A crude stick figure

download the sketch—view the code

Mars Altimetery Graph // ver B // Monday Banner

Monday, June 2nd, 2008

Mars Altimetery Graph ver B
run the sketch—view the code—download

How do you use it?
Primarily just watch and enjoy. A mouse click toggles the drawing of the green lines. (This looks best if you let it run for a while so I recommend downloading and running it in Processing locally.)

What is it?
This is a functioning version of Friday’s post. I thought it might help me figure out the MEGDR Viewer if I looked at the same data in a different way, so I enlisted the techniques from the Line Graph sketch. It now creates an overlapping area graph of Mars altimetry data*. I switched to continuous mode (i.e. using setup() and draw()), and had to load the data into a string instead of a byte array. I could only get the byte array to work if it was instantiated inside of draw(). Loading a 2MB file in each cycle of the draw loop made it unbearably slow.

*Citation:
Smith, D., G. Neumann, R. E. Arvidson, E. A. Guinness,
and S. Slavney, “Mars Global Surveyor Laser Altimeter Mission
Experiment Gridded Data Record”, NASA Planetary Data System,
MGS-M-MOLA-5-MEGDR-L3-V1.0, 2003.

Mars Altimetery Graph // ver A

Friday, May 30th, 2008

Code of Mars Altimetery Graph
download the sketch—view the code

What is it?
I thought it might help me figure out the MEGDR Viewer if I looked at the same data in a different way. This sketch is meant to render an area graph of Mars altimetry data. It is written to run in basic mode since it is meant to render one image and there is no interactivity. But… it doesn’t work. I either get a file not accessible error on the loadBytes line, or the drawing window simply never pops up. Maybe I’m being too impatient and I should let it run overnight. But even if that is the case, something must still be wrong with my code because this shouldn’t be that hard for the computer.

Mars Global Surveyor: MEGDR Viewer // ver D

Thursday, May 29th, 2008

Mars Global Surveyor: MEGDR Viewer// ver D
run the sketch—view the code—download

How do you use it?
Press any key to switch between the color and grayscale rendering of the data file.

What is it?
The continuation of version C. Because these were the first images I saw, I was mistakenly assuming there was color information in the data file. So all of my attempts to extract RGB values from the data were pointless.

Mars Global Surveyor: MEGDR Viewer // ver C

Wednesday, May 28th, 2008

Mars Global Surveyor: MEGDR Viewer// ver C
run the sketch—view the code

How do you use it?
Move the mouse up and down to adjust the color offset.

What is it?
This is an interactive version of Monday’s sketch. It’s another attempt at rendering an image from a Mars Orbiter Laser Altimetry data file. It’s also confounding, infuriating, and not working. I can’t quite get my head wrapped around the bitwise operations and the bitmasking. It’s getting a wider range of colors, and it’s revealing more detail in the image, but I don’t understand why the colors aren’t smooth.