Archive for the 'Finished' Category

Ball Thing // ver C

Friday, May 9th, 2008

_20080509_ballThing_c
run the sketch—view the code

How do you use it?
Move the mouse around to position the crosshairs. Type “r” to toggle the radar. Click the mouse to position a set of lines.

mondayBanner // 05 May 2008

Monday, May 5th, 2008

_20080505_mondayBanner
run the sketch—view the code

How do you use it?
Just move the mouse around. If you run it in Processing you can save a .png of the drawing by hitting any key.

What is it?
Today I’m starting a new weekly feature, the Monday Banner. Every Monday the will be a new header image on the blog and I will post the sketch that generated it.

More fun with the Video Library

Sunday, May 4th, 2008

cameraFun_b
watch the video—view the code

How do you use it?
Move in front of the camera. Anything that is cut off by the right edge of the camera frame will leave a trail.
What is it?
A stripped-down version of yesterday’s sketch. The mouse interactivity was just getting in the way. This is where all the fun happens.

Why is it cool?
It takes me back to the days (nights really) when I would pump all of my spare change into the copy machine to make abstract images by moving stuff around on the glass while it was scanning.

Simple Spiral

Friday, April 25th, 2008

_20080425_spiral_a.png
run the sketch—view the code

_20080425_spiral_b.png
run the sketch—view the code

How do you use it?
Move the mouse up and down to change the tightness of the spiral. In version b, moving the mouse left and right also affects the spacing. Clicking the mouse rotates the whole thing in 3-D space.

What is it?
A quick way to render a spiral.

Why is it cool?
When I had the idea to code a spiral, I assumed it would take days and involve all sorts of calculus and stuff. It took 3 lines of code, a for() loop, and 10 minutes start to finish.

Pong Mobile!!!

Monday, April 21st, 2008

Kinda Pong
run the sketch—view the code

How do you use it?
The LEFT and RIGHT direction keys move the paddle. 1, 2 and 3 on the keypad adjust the speed, and the “Sound” soft key toggles the sound and vibration feedback.

You can play with it in the emulator, download the .jar file and bluetooth it to your phone, or visit http://p365.armatodesign.com/mobile/ with your phone’s browser and download it directly to your phone.

What is it?
Just a little game for your phone. It’s a little buggy, but it works. And, it runs on my phone! If you turn on the sound it uses Mobile Processing’s Sound and Phone libraries to generate tones and activate the phone’s vibrate motor. (I’ve noticed on my phone that it will crash if I turn on the sound when the phone is set to a mode that has application sounds and/or vibration turned off.)

Why is it cool?
I tried to program something like this in Basic on an Apple ][ in 8th grade. I couldn’t get it to work back then. Now I not only have it working, but it runs on my phone!

Banner Ad

Friday, April 18th, 2008

_20080417_bannerType.png
run the sketch—view the code

How do you use it?
Move the mouse left and right to spin the informational text.

What is it?
This is an interactive banner ad I created to promote a Processing workshop I am teaching for graphic design students. It uses nested for loops to make the grid and the random() function to keep the colors changing. Actually, I created a grid() function that takes values for X-position and width, so the two chunks of grid seen here are the result of two different calls to grid(). The what, where, and when info spins around in P3D space.

Why is it cool?
The aforementioned grid() is a good example of user-defined functions. Also, I just love playing with type in 3-D space.

Countdown Clock // ver DUH!

Monday, April 14th, 2008

_20080414_desktopClock_e
run the sketch—view the code

Download app: OSX, Windows

How do you use it?
The UP and DOWN arrows increase and decrease the countdown time in 5-minute increments. The TAB key restarts the countdown at the current time setting.

What is it?
A visual countdown timer. Time = area. You choose how much time you want to allot for completing a certain task and then leave this baby running in the corner of your screen. The red wedges show you the passing of each second and the number tells you how many minutes are left. The yellow circle gives a visual representation of the quantity of time remaining. No matter how many minutes you start with, the yellow circle an the red circle start out the same size. This provides a point of comparison as the yellow circle shrinks.
(see the digiLog Clock post for more of my musings on the subject of time)
Why is it cool?
On the last version I was changing the diameter of the yellow circle every second. My intention was for area to be equivalent to time. It occurred to me (while I was waiting in a doctor’s office, staring at a clock) that calculating the diameter resulted in a non-linear relationship between the passing of each second and the area of the circle—time and area were not equivalent. So I changed the math and now the area of the yellow circle shrinks in direct proportion to the time (the diameter is now the non-linear one).